ImageTexT: Interdisciplinary Comics Studies

ISSN: 1549-6732

Call for Papers

This page includes calls for upcoming ImageTexT issues as well as calls for various journals and collections. Please email the editors if you would like a call added.

CFP: Comics and Fine Art (ImageTexT)

(1 Apr. 2016)


Editors:
Colin Beineke and Ben Novotny Owen

ImageText is accepting paper submissions for a special forum on the topic of “Comics and Fine Art.” As comics scholar Bart Beaty has noted, “One of the significant consequences of the literary turn in the study of comics has been a tendency to drive attention away from comics as a form of visual culture. Comics have rarely been considered an art form akin to painting, sculpture, or photography, and they are not commonly taught in courses in art history.” The segregation of comics and art historical/critical scholarship has left comics studies impoverished of potentially useful critical vocabulary and methodology. Additionally, it has lead scholars of fine art and comics alike to neglect the rich history of exchange between the two forms, which can be dated back to at least the French avant-garde of the late nineteenth century.

Looking to fill this gap, this special forum will take seriously the status of comics as a visual art which shares much in the way of style, technique, and form with works of the fine art world. We seek to gather a collection of essays which demonstrate the potential for dialogue between these disciplines and their respective objects of study. In general, we are interested in papers which address some aspect of the rapport between comics and fine art. Submissions in the range of 6,000-10,000 words are welcome.

In particular, we are interested in collecting essays which address:

Completed submissions for this special forum are due on April 1st, 2016. Please send all submissions or questions to Colin Beineke at colin.beineke@mizzou.edu and Ben Novonty Owen at owen.179@osu.edu. Please also read the ImageText submissions guidelines: http://www.english.ufl.edu/imagetext/submissions.shtml. All images should be provided as ZIP files.

Submissions will be peer-reviewed and returned by June 15th, 2016. This special forum is scheduled to appear in the winter of 2017.

Traumics: Comics Narratives of Trauma: A Special Forum of ImageTexT

(1 Nov. 2015)
Editors:
Najwa Al-Tabaa, Spencer Chalifour, and Kayley Thomas

ImageTexT at the University of Florida invites applicants to submit full-length articles (6,000-10,000 words) on Traumics: Comics Narratives of Trauma by Nov. 1, 2015.

Traumics are, simply put, comics plus trauma. With their syntax of panels, gutters, and pages and their use of the evocative power of image in conjunction with the precise communication of text, comics are uniquely suited to delivering narratives of trauma. The relationship of trauma (especially childhood trauma) to the comics medium is a thread that runs throughout Hillary L. Chute's 2010 Graphic Women: Life Narrative & Contemporary Comics, a book which is structured around exploring the works of five autobiographical comics artists (Aline Kominsky-Crumb, Phoebe Gloeckner, Lynda Barry, Marjane Satrapi, and Alison Bechdel). By their very nature, comics provide a potentially ideal means through which to tell those stories that require the fragmentation and reconstruction of events of high drama and emotional intensity. The juxtaposition of images on the comic page make comics what might be considered a ‘natural' fit for exploring the concept of "Remembering, repeating, and working-through" examined so in-depth in Cathy Caruth's seminal 1996 work on trauma, Unclaimed Experience: Trauma, Narrative and History.

More than two decades ago, Art Spiegelman's Pulitzer-winning opus, Maus, changed the way much of the reading public views comics, and is now one of the most iconic and recognizable Holocaust narratives to be studied in the classroom or found on bookstore shelves. Since the turn of the century, autobiographical comics like Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, and Phoebe Gloeckner's Diary of a Teenage Girl have all been released to great critical acclaim. Epileptic, David B.'s autobiographical exploration of medical trauma, hugged the transition from the 1900s to the 2000s, with its original French release running from 1996 to 2003; more recently, David Small's autobiographical Stitches (2009) also forced a spotlight on medical trauma, using bold, rough graphics to recount the horror of a child's battle with cancer. Robert Kirkman's zombie survival horror comic The Walking Dead (which began its run in 2003 and continues today) has captured the American cultural imagination, with its adaptations ranging from a television show and video game to a prominent role in the most recent Halloween Horror Nights attraction at Universal Studios. Comics and war narratives (as well as war reporting) have also gone hand-in-hand for many years; just this November, noted war comics writer and artist Joe Sacco released his latest work, The Great War, which tells the story of the first day of the Battle of the Somme in one continuous, 24-foot drawing. Comics have become one of the most important and visible venues through which a 21st-century audience understands, imagines, and works through traumatic events.

We invite papers from all disciplines on the theme of "traumics: comics narratives of trauma." Possible topics include but are not limited to:

"Traumics: Comics Narratives of Trauma" will consider papers from graduate students, professors, independent scholars, undergraduates and other academics, and all submissions will be judged based on merit.

Submissions should be between 6,000-10,000 words, and are due Nov. 1, 2015. All proposals should be submitted to imagetext@english.ufl.edu with the subject line, RE: Traumics Forum

Please see the ImageTexT Submission Guidelines for more information on formatting, image inclusion, and the review process: http://www.english.ufl.edu/imagetext/submissions.shtml

All content is (c) ImageTexT 2004 - 2015 unless otherwise noted. All authors and artists retain copyright unless otherwise noted.
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ImageTexT is published by the Department of English at the University of Florida.